OMG, an eagle!

C.C.: [Points out car window] “Oh look! An eagle! OMG, it’s totally an eagle!”
Me: “Um, that’s not an eagle. That’s just a crow with a piece of bread in its mouth.”
C.C.: “Uh, huh. You’re right. OK. This does not leave this car.”
Me: “The hell it doesn’t.”
T.T.: “And to think, we get to see it eating its natural preyβ€”bread.”
C.C.: “All right. Enough.”
Me: “You know, eagles developed their keen vision so they could spot wild herds of bread from a mile in the air. Then they swoop down and snatch one before it escapes.”
C.C.: “Enough!”
T.T.: “Bread can be quite wily, I hear.”
Me: “Indeed. Very wily.”
C.C.: “Fuckers.”

31 Replies to “OMG, an eagle!”

  1. When the crow caught that bread, it was toast… πŸ™„

    When C.C. said ‘OMG, an eagle!’ in total shock, I had thought that an actual RUNNING AMC Eagle had been spotted. πŸ˜€

  2. πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€ I’m am so hoping CC is a girl!!!! πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€

  3. When I was a kid, I use to look forward to bread hunting season. We’d set traps around the campsite and leave trays of peanut butter or jam in order to lure them in. On the cooler nights, we’d plug in toasters (which was actually illegal, but very effective) and man, we’d bag them by the loaf. A few nights like that and we’d have enough to get us through the winter.

    I can remember one year in particular when it felt like it rained every single day during bread hunting season. The multi grain breed seemed a bit tougher and was able to survive in the wet but the common white and whole wheat breeds would just get weighed down by the wetness and …. well, let’s just say that it wasn’t a pretty site. You could hear their cries for help when they’d fall in to a puddle. The worst part was that you knew that it was already too late and there was nothing that you could do for them. I think that probably the reason why even today I can’t eat French Onion soup.

  4. [quote comment=”442226″]When I was a kid, I use to look forward to bread hunting season. We’d set traps around the campsite and leave trays of peanut butter or jam in order to lure them in. On the cooler nights, we’d plug in toasters (which was actually illegal, but very effective) and man, we’d bag them by the loaf. A few nights like that and we’d have enough to get us through the winter.

    I can remember one year in particular when it felt like it rained every single day during bread hunting season. The multi grain breed seemed a bit tougher and was able to survive in the wet but the common white and whole wheat breeds would just get weighed down by the wetness and …. well, let’s just say that it wasn’t a pretty site. You could hear their cries for help when they’d fall in to a puddle. The worst part was that you knew that it was already too late and there was nothing that you could do for them. I think that probably the reason why even today I can’t eat French Onion soup.[/quote]
    the next time the writers go on strike they need not come back. Hollywood’s got a writer right in Z-land. πŸ˜‰

  5. Thanks Jules, I appreciate that. Times were different then; back when the men would go out and bring home the bread. I remember the look of pride on dad’s face when he would stand at the head of the table with knives in hand, ready to carve that loaf when mom took it out of the oven. Back then, us kids use to fight over who would get the foot.

    Nowadays it’s all about convenience and most people buy farmed bread from the stores. Sure, the meat of the bread is whiter but it just doesn’t taste the same. Having seen them in the wild, I have a hard time thinking about them living out their days in those tiny loaf pans, just waiting until they go to the slicer and then get bagged and tagged. That’s why we try to get the free range bread when we can. Sure, it costs a little bit more, but to me, it just tastes better.

  6. [quote comment=”442084″]:D πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€ I’m am so hoping CC is a girl!!!! πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€ :D[/quote]
    No! He’s a grown man!

  7. [quote comment=”442226″]When I was a kid, I use to look forward to bread hunting season. We’d set traps around the campsite and leave trays of peanut butter or jam in order to lure them in. On the cooler nights, we’d plug in toasters (which was actually illegal, but very effective) and man, we’d bag them by the loaf. A few nights like that and we’d have enough to get us through the winter.

    I can remember one year in particular when it felt like it rained every single day during bread hunting season. The multi grain breed seemed a bit tougher and was able to survive in the wet but the common white and whole wheat breeds would just get weighed down by the wetness and …. well, let’s just say that it wasn’t a pretty site. You could hear their cries for help when they’d fall in to a puddle. The worst part was that you knew that it was already too late and there was nothing that you could do for them. I think that probably the reason why even today I can’t eat French Onion soup.[/quote]
    Winner!

  8. This had me laughing so hard – it was just what I needed to get my day started!

    Then to read this:

    When I was a kid, I use to look forward to bread hunting season. We’d set traps around the campsite and leave trays of peanut butter or jam in order to lure them in. On the cooler nights, we’d plug in toasters (which was actually illegal, but very effective) and man, we’d bag them by the loaf. A few nights like that and we’d have enough to get us through the winter.

    I can remember one year in particular when it felt like it rained every single day during bread hunting season. The multi grain breed seemed a bit tougher and was able to survive in the wet but the common white and whole wheat breeds would just get weighed down by the wetness and …. well, let’s just say that it wasn’t a pretty site. You could hear their cries for help when they’d fall in to a puddle. The worst part was that you knew that it was already too late and there was nothing that you could do for them. I think that probably the reason why even today I can’t eat French Onion soup.

    Priceless!

  9. [quote comment=”442280″]Thanks Jules, I appreciate that. Times were different then; back when the men would go out and bring home the bread. I remember the look of pride on dad’s face when he would stand at the head of the table with knives in hand, ready to carve that loaf when mom took it out of the oven. Back then, us kids use to fight over who would get the foot.

    Nowadays it’s all about convenience and most people buy farmed bread from the stores. Sure, the meat of the bread is whiter but it just doesn’t taste the same. Having seen them in the wild, I have a hard time thinking about them living out their days in those tiny loaf pans, just waiting until they go to the slicer and then get bagged and tagged. That’s why we try to get the free range bread when we can. Sure, it costs a little bit more, but to me, it just tastes better.[/quote]
    i don’t know if you had this back then but i do believe the term came from there: During the festive season the men would line up and compete at various events (including who could piss the furthest) and the top prize, the one that was coveted by all, the one the town would talk about – and even get the mayors recognition, this prize was what the women would be brought back home. all the towns people gathered to witness the prize giving day as the winner was named BREAD WINNER! ahhh the good ol’ times.

  10. Man does not live by bread alone ………. However, some sliced meat, cheese and condiments can go a long way. Interesting calling the end of the loaf the foot, always heard it called the heel, must be regional/international differences.

  11. Whats black and white and black and white and rolls around a parking lot ? A crow and a nun fighting over a bread crust…

  12. [quote comment=”442382″]StevieC: Smart, funny, and horny. Are you taken????[/quote]

    Take me!

    [quote comment=”442383″]Oh, but, wait….. You’re Canadian, right?

    Knew there was a hitch.[/quote]

    We’re currently on sale – only 86 cents for a dollar’s worth.

  13. [quote comment=”442384″]Whats black and white and black and white and rolls around a parking lot ? A crow and a nun fighting over a bread crust…[/quote]
    LMAO! you know you’re gonna burn, right? πŸ˜†

  14. [quote comment=”442381″]Man does not live by bread alone ………. However, some sliced meat, cheese and condiments can go a long way. Interesting calling the end of the loaf the foot, always heard it called the heel, must be regional/international differences.[/quote]

    Naw, it’s more of a farmed bread/wild bread thing.

  15. [quote comment=”442713″]StevieC…… you totally cracked me up. A funny man is such a turn on!! :kiss:[/quote]

    Is it hot in here or is it just me? Laughing is okay peaches, so long as you don’t point.

  16. Dave, I think C.C needs to get out more often. The zoo or wild animal park might be a good start

  17. [quote comment=”442729″][quote comment=”442713″]StevieC…… you totally cracked me up. A funny man is such a turn on!! :kiss:[/quote]

    Is it hot in here or is it just me? Laughing is okay peaches, so long as you don’t point.[/quote]
    I wouldn’t think of it!! :wang: :kiss:

  18. [quote comment=”442084″]:D πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€ I’m am so hoping CC is a girl!!!! πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€ :D[/quote]
    And blonde…

    Of course now I know She’s a he…

  19. I was going to say something awfully witty about eagles, bread n’ stuff, but after seeing the response Stevie C got for his wiley post, I got all nervous and flustered and stuff and dropped the bread.

  20. Scoff and joke all you want. Just you wait until the Wonder Bread and Kraft singles rise up to start making grilled people sandwiches. Don’t forget about the tomato soup ninjas!

  21. [quote comment=”442729″][quote comment=”442713″]StevieC…… you totally cracked me up. A funny man is such a turn on!! :kiss:[/quote]

    Is it hot in here or is it just me? Laughing is okay peaches, so long as you don’t point.[/quote]
    I’ll be using my tongue to point!

  22. [quote comment=”444368″][quote comment=”442729″][quote comment=”442713″]StevieC…… you totally cracked me up. A funny man is such a turn on!! :kiss:[/quote]

    Is it hot in here or is it just me? Laughing is okay peaches, so long as you don’t point.[/quote]
    I’ll be using my tongue to point![/quote]

    If I follow you home will you keep me?

Comments are closed.